Project Profiles

East Lake St. Clair Wind

East Lake St. Clair Wind by GDF Suez Canada Inc. (99 MW FIT wind project, July 2011) Community of Chatham, ON

The East Lake St. Clair wind facility received a contract under the Feed-In Tariff (FIT) program in July 2011. The project, located in Chatham-Kent, north of the community of Chatham, came into service in May 2013. It has 55 wind turbines in operation with a total electricity generation capacity of 99 megawatts (MW).

AIM PowerGen (now GDF SUEZ Canada Inc.) was responsible for all stages of project development, including Planning, Developing, Financing, Constructing and Operating.

The East Lake St. Clair and Erieau wind projects, both developed by GDF SUEZ Canada Inc., were projected to create approximately 250 construction jobs during their peak construction periods, and contribute roughly $50 million into the local economy. Between the two facilities, it is also predicted that one dozen operating and maintenance positions would be created.

GDF SUEZ Canada has also been active in the Chatham-Kent municipality, from supporting The Greening Partnership of the Lower Thames Valley Conservation Authority to plant more than 10,000 white cedar trees across the municipality and restore wetlands, to making sizeable donations to the Chatham Santa Claus Parade.

City of London

City of London and Tourism London, Solar Tree (8.5 kW microFIT system, ground-mount solar PV)

The City of London – known as the Forest City – and Tourism London came up with a very creative way to branch out into green energy.

The City of London installed a 7 metre (23 foot) “solar tree” in the shape of the city logo outside the Tourism London building in October 2010. This tree is part of a ground-mount microFIT solar photovoltaic (PV) generation system which has a total capacity of 8.6 kilowatts (kW). It can produce about half the annual electricity required for the Tourism London building located at 696 Wellington Road.

The eye-catching solar array has been popular with tourists, who sometimes stop to pose for photos with the landmark structure. The project is expected to generate revenues of $165,000 over the 20-year term of the microFIT contract.

The City of London has other microFIT solar PV projects installed at municipal sites across the city, including the Southeast Reservoir Pump Station, which has a 10 kilowatt (kW) ground-mounted installation.

London’s Mayor also launched the Mayor’s Sustainable Energy Council (MSEC) in 2007. MSEC is a voluntary council made up of over 30 energy professionals appointed by the Mayor. The council works to promote, encourage and support the development and implementation of practical research and initiatives, technologies and investment in the area of sustainable energy. For more information see: www.londonenergysaver.ca/.

Grand Renewable Wind

Grand Renewable Wind by Samsung (149 MW GEIA wind project, Haldimand County, ON)

The Grand Renewable Wind project was developed as part of the 2010 Green Energy Investment Agreement (GEIA) reached between Ontario and Samsung C&T Corporation and Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO). KEPCO was released from its obligations under the GEIA in October 2014.

The 149 megawatt (MW) wind project, located in Haldimand County, utilizes 67 Siemens Wind Turbines and CS Wind towers. Over 1000 Ontarians contributed to the manufacturing and installation of the turbines, which use all Ontario-made blades and towers.

In a historic first for Ontario, Samsung has entered into an equity partnership with Six Nations of the Grand River. The Six Nations community owns 10% of the Grand Renewable Wind project. Samsung also announced a $400,000 donation to the Grand River Post-Secondary Education Office, which will increase opportunities for Six Nations students.

In conjunction with the Grand Renewable Wind project, Samsung has also introduced a $15 million Community Vibrancy Fund for Haldimand County. The fund will support local community, environment, health and wellness initiatives and provide a stable source of community support over the next 20 years.

City of Windsor

City of Windsor, Windsor International Aquatic and Training Centre (350 kW FIT project, rooftop solar PV, March 2015)

The Windsor International Aquatic and Training Centre is home to a 350 kilowatt (kW) rooftop solar photovoltaic (PV) project with a contract under Ontario’s Feed-In Tariff (FIT) program. The City of Windsor estimates that the $1.1 million dollar project, which includes 1,500 solar panels, will produce enough electricity to power the equivalent of approximately 44 homes.

The rooftop system, which is not visible from the ground, is expected to require little or no maintenance, as there are no moving parts. At the conclusion of the 20-year FIT contract, the equipment, which the city expects to outlast the contract, will either continue to produce electricity to sell to the provincial grid, or that electricity will be used to power municipal facilities.

The City of Windsor has indicated that they anticipate annual production from the project to be approximately $250,000 and that they are implementing three more solar projects under the FIT program. These projects include the development of a 250 kW solar facility at the Forest Glade Arena, a 500 kW PV system at the WFCU Centre and a 500 kW PV system at the Transit Windsor administrative headquarters.

Umbata Falls Generating Station

Umbata Falls Generating Station by Ojibways of the Pic River First Nation and Innergex Renewable Energy Inc. (23 MW RES waterpower project, November 2008) White River, ON.

The 23 megawatt (MW) Umbata Falls Generating Station obtained an electricity contract in 2004 under the previous Renewable Energy Supply (RES) competitive procurement process. This run-of-river waterpower project came into operation in November 2008 and is located on the White River, a tributary of Lake Superior that is roughly 30 kilometres southeast of Marathon, Ontario.

The project is majority owned by the Ojibways of the Pic River First Nation, and was developed by Innergex Renewable Energy Inc. The ownership and anticipated revenues from the project are expected to provide full or partial funding for a number of Pic River community programs including, educational enhancements (e.g., elementary school support, special education programs, day care programs), infrastructure enhancements (e.g., water treatment plant), housing (e.g., renovations and new housing) and other community development programs (e.g., small business support).

The facility has obtained EcoLogo certification for its reduced impact on environment. The facility site is also open to visitors, with informative signs installed around the site for the public and a viewing platform of the falls.

The Perley and Rideau Veterans’ Health Centre

Perley and Rideau Veterans’ Health Centre (250 kW FIT rooftop solar PV project, May 2014) Ottawa, ON

The Perley and Rideau Veterans’ Health Centre is a not-for-profit centre for healthy living located in Ottawa, Ontario. The centre primarily focuses on providing quality care for veterans and seniors in the community.

The centre recently completed a $6.6 million facility renewal program, including more than 100 energy retrofits and the installation of 1,200 solar photovoltaic (PV) panels with a generating capacity of 250 kilowatts (kW) under Ontario’s Feed-In Tariff (FIT) program. The solar project went into operation in May 2014 and is expected to generate revenues of more than $200,000 per year.

The energy retrofits implemented under the facility renewal program included lighting upgrades, air systems modifications, water conservation measures and the installation of a new central heating and cooling plant. These upgrades are expected to result in savings of $360,000 per year.

City of Brockville

City of Brockville, Memorial Centre (200 kW FIT project, rooftop solar PV, September 2011)

Two of Brockville’s municipal buildings feature solar photovoltaic (PV) rooftop installations developed under Ontario’s Feed-In Tariff (FIT) program. The first, located on the roof of the Brockville Memorial Centre, is a 200 kilowatt (kW) solar PV array that went into commercial operation in September 2011. The second, a 60 kW solar PV array located on the roof of the Gord Watts Municipal Centre, went online in November 2012.

The City of Brockville expects that combined these solar projects will generate approximately $5 million in revenue for the municipality over the course of their 20-year FIT contracts.

These renewable energy projects are helping the City of Brockville meet the sustainability targets laid out in its Official Plan, 2012.

Town of Mono

Town of Mono, Public Works Garage (100 kW FIT project, rooftop solar PV, December 2014)

The Town of Mono installed a 100 kilowatt (kW) solar photovoltaic (PV) system on the roof of the town’s Public Works Garage in 2014. The project was developed under Ontario’s Feed-In Tariff (FIT) program and had a total project cost of $391,431, which was funded through the town’s reserves.

The Town of Mono estimates that the solar project will generate a total of 138 megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity annually and that they will receive a net revenue of approximately $800,000 over the 20-year span of the FIT contract (taking into account capital costs, maintenance and repairs).

This project aligns with the Town of Mono’s Strategic Plan 2011-2015, which encourages the Town Council to consider solar PV systems for municipal buildings.

City of Guelph

City of Guelph, Southgate Solar (100 kW FIT project, rooftop solar PV, July 2010)

In April 2007, Guelph’s City Council endorsed a 25-year Community Energy Initiative with ambitious goals. This initiative seeks to reduce per capita energy use by 50 per cent and per capita greenhouse gas emissions by 60 per cent, even as Guelph’s population increases by 50 per cent.

The Community Energy Initiative also sets a target of having 1,000 solar photovoltaic (PV) roofs in operation by 2031. The City of Guelph was able to achieve this target 17 years ahead of schedule – in 2013 – in large part due to the popularity of Ontario’s Feed-In Tariff (FIT) and microFIT programs. Municipally-owned Envida Community Energy also contributed to the achievement of the city’s goal by leasing the rooftops of municipal buildings, as well as land owned by the City of Guelph, for the solar installations.

The city now has solar energy generation systems located on seven buildings, including fire stations, a public works building, a lawn bowling club and a ground-mounted solar installation near the Speedvale water tower (pictured). These systems, totalling 68 kilowatts (kW), were all contracted under Ontario’s microFIT program.

In recognition of its efforts to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, the City of Guelph received two awards from the Federation of Canadian Municipalities in 2014.

Erieau Wind

Erieau Wind by GDF Suez Canada Inc. (99 MW FIT wind project, May 2011) Chatham-Kent, ON

The Erieau Wind energy project is located in southeast Chatham-Kent, on the northern shore of Lake Erie. This 99 megawatt (MW) project, which includes 55 wind turbines, received a contract under the Feed-In Tariff (FIT) program in 2011. The project started operation in May 2013 and now produces enough energy to power nearly 55,000 homes annually.

AIM PowerGen (now GDF SUEZ Canada Inc.) was responsible for all stages of project development, including Planning, Developing, Financing, Constructing and Operating.

The Erieau and East Lake St. Clair wind projects, both developed by GDF SUEZ Canada Inc., were projected to create approximately 250 construction jobs during their peak construction periods, and contribute roughly $50 million into the local economy. Between the two facilities, it is also predicted that one dozen operating and maintenance positions would be created.

South Kent Wind Project

South Kent Wind by Samsung (270 MW GEIA wind project, Chatham-Kent, ON)

The 270 megawatt (MW) Samsung South Kent Wind project is one of the largest wind power facilities in Canada. The project is located in the Municipality of Chatham-Kent and was developed as part of the 2010 Green Energy Investment Agreement (GEIA) reached between Ontario and Samsung C&T Corporation and Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO). KEPCO was released from its obligations under the GEIA in October 2014.

Over 1000 workers from Ontario contributed to the South Kent Wind project, from manufacture and assembly of the wind turbine components to site construction. The wind turbines are composed of blades and towers that were made in Ontario: the blades were manufactured at the Siemens’ turbine blade facility in Tillsonburg, Ontario and the turbine towers were constructed using steel from Ontario at the CS Wind’s facility in Windsor, Ontario.

The South Kent Wind project also established the South Kent Wind Community Fund that is administered by the Chatham Kent Community Foundation. South Kent Wind contributed an initial one million dollars to establish the South Kent Wind Community Fund endowment and will donate an additional ten million dollars over the next twenty years.

The South Kent Wind Community Fund will support community resilience and prosperity by funding initiatives in five key areas including: (i) community (inspiring local community support and engagement), (ii) environment (enhancing community action on ecological preservation), (iii) health and wellness (proactively fostering individual and community health and wellness), (iv) youth and education (meeting the needs of children and youth development), and (v) First Nation and Métis initiatives (benefitting First Nations and Metis whose traditional territory is within Chatham-Kent).

Grant applications are evaluated bi-annually by a committee of seven members from the Chatham-Kent community and The Chatham Kent Community Foundation. It is expected the fund will contribute approximately $250,000 to local charitable organizations each year in perpetuity.

Chaudière Falls

Existing waterpower facilities located at Chaudière Falls along the Ottawa River.

In 2014, Hydro Ottawa obtained a 40-year contract under the Hydroelectric Standard Offer Program (HESOP) Municipal Stream for a new 29 megawatt (MW) waterpower generation facility at Chaudière Falls, located on the Ottawa River.

Construction of the facility is planned to start in 2015 and is expected to create upwards of 150 high-quality jobs in the construction industry. Hydro Ottawa expects to complete the project in 2017.

Hydro Ottawa expects the new Chaudière Falls project to generate clean energy to power 20,000 homes annually. The project is also expected to provide more than $15 million in annual revenue for the municipal-owned utility. This revenue will be shared with the City of Ottawa.

South Branch Wind Farm

South Branch Wind Farm by EDP Renewables Canada (30 MW FIT wind project, 2014) in South Dundas, ON

The South Branch Wind Farm, which began operating in 2014, is located approximately 70 kilometres south of Ottawa within the Municipality of South Dundas in the United Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry.

The 10-turbine, 30 megawatt (MW) project can generate enough electricity to meet the needs of an estimated 8,300 homes a year. In addition, the developer (EDP Renewables Canada), estimates that the annual environmental benefits of the project are the equivalent of removing 13,500 cars off the road.

During the development of the project, EDP Renewables Canada responded to concerns from local residents, and made changes to the design of the project to accommodate these concerns. The project allows local landowners to continue their agricultural operations while deriving an additional source of income by hosting turbines and project infrastructure.

Economic benefits of the project include payments to landowners, local spending, municipal taxes and an annual $30,000 community benefits investment which is indexed and will escalate for 20 years. This investment has been used to establish the South Branch Community Fund, a fund that provides significant benefits to the community in the form of support for recreational facilities and programs, benefit community gathering facilities, events and related municipal usage fees; educational and job training tools related to sustainable or renewable energy; and, other community related activities approved by the Municipality of South Dundas.

Kapuskasing River Waterpower Project

White Otter Falls by Chapleau Cree First Nation and Hydromega Services Inc. (5.5 MW FIT waterpower project, 2013). Part of the Kapuskasing River Waterpower Project.

The Kapuskasing River Waterpower Project is a 22 megawatt (MW) project that includes four identical hydroelectric generation sites of 5.5 megawatts (MW) each (Big Beaver Falls, Camp Three Rapids, White Otter Falls, Old Woman Falls) along the Kapuskasing River in northeastern Ontario. These sites obtained power purchase agreements under the Feed-In Tariff (FIT) program in 2010, and came into operation in 2013.

This project has demonstrated successful partnerships between the four project owners, including three First Nation communities (Brunswick House First Nation and Chapleau Ojibwe First Nation for Big Beaver Falls and Camp Three Rapids, Chapleau Cree First Nation for White Otter Falls) and the company Hydromega Services Inc.

When Hydromega, a private sector developer, first approached the communities in 2005 regarding the project, they initiated a dialogue and, most importantly, asked the First Nations how they could build the facility together. One of the main requirements of the community was that they needed to have an ownership role in the assets because the multigenerational revenue stream generated would then be filtered back into the communities.

City of North Bay

Merrick Landfill Power Plant by North Bay Hydro (1.6 MW FIT landfill biogas project, June 2012)

The Merrick Landfill Project, developed by North Bay Hydro Distribution Limited, generates electricity by burning landfill gas. This gas is made up mostly of methane, which is produced in the breakdown of organic waste inside the landfill. The gas produced at the Merrick Landfill was previously burned off (or “flared”) without capturing the energy produced.

In 2013, the project collected over 5.8 million cubic-meters of landfill gas, reducing the greenhouse gas emissions from the city’s landfill by over 44 thousand tonnes. The new landfill gas generator allows the landfill gas to generate as much as 1.6 megawatts (MW) of electricity, which is enough to power more than 1,000 homes.

North Bay Hydro is wholly owned by the City of North Bay. The project started generating electricity in 2012, and it has a 20-year contract under Ontario’s Feed-In Tariff (FIT) program to provide power to the Ontario grid. The City of North Bay projects their annual revenue from the project to be between $350,000 and $450,000.

Essex Energy Corporation

Vollmer Culture and Recreation Ice Complex, Town of LaSalle, Essex County, ON (250 kW FIT rooftop solar PV project, 2011) by Essex Energy Corporation

Municipally-owned Essex Energy Corporation developed a 250 kilowatt (kW) rooftop solar photovoltaic (PV) project at the Vollmer Culture and Recreation Ice Complex in the Town of LaSalle in Essex County. Essex Energy Corporation estimates that the project, developed under Ontario’s Feed-In Tariff (FIT) program, will produce enough energy to power approximately 41 homes each year.

In addition to the project’s economic and environmental benefits, the Vollmer Culture and Recreation Ice Complex provides the local community with a progressive learning platform. The Complex has hosted educational tours for student groups at the University of Windsor and also supplies the University with data from the solar project to assist researchers and graduate students in collaboration with Essex Energy Corporation.

Pointe-Aux-Roches Wind

Pointe-Aux-Roches Wind by GDF Suez Canada Inc. (48.6 MW FIT wind project, December 2011) Town of Lakeshore, ON

The Pointe-Aux-Roches wind energy project, located approximately 40 kilometres east of Windsor, Ontario, has 27 wind turbines with a total electricity generation capacity of 48.6 megawatts (MW). The site is located in the Town of Lakeshore in Essex County, near the southern shore of Lake St. Clair.

Pointe-Aux-Roches operates Vestas V90 1.8 MW – IEC Class II turbines mounted on tubular towers, which are made from 100 per cent Ontario steel. The steel was fabricated at Essar Steel Algoma in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, helping the company to sustain operating and employment levels.

The project received a Feed-In Tariff (FIT) contract offer in April 2010. The project had previously undertaken environmental approvals, and construction began in September 2010.

Construction was completed via a Turbine Supply Agreement with Vestas and a Balance of Plant Construction Agreement with AMEC Black & McDonald. The facility has been in operation since December 2011.

Harrow Wind

Harrow Wind by GDF Suez Canada Inc. (39.6 MW (total across 4 sites) FIT wind project, May 2010) Town of Essex, ON

Located in the Town of Essex, in Essex County, the Harrow wind facility consists of four 9.9 megawatt (MW) sites with a total electricity generation capacity of 39.6 MW. There are a total of 24 wind turbines in operation across the four sites, which are primarily located on open farmland along the northern edge of Lake Erie.

The Harrow wind facility obtained a contract under Ontario’s former Renewable Energy Standard Offer Program (RESOP) in 2008. Construction of the facility began in October 2009, with AIM PowerGen (now GDF SUEZ Canada Inc.) responsible for all stages of project development, including planning, developing, financing, constructing and operating. The project has been in operation since May 2010.